download ebook how children succeed pdf epub

Paul Tough

Challenges conventional views about standardized testing to argue that success is more determined by self-discipline, and describes the work of pioneering researchers and educators who have enabled effective new teaching methods.

download ebook how children succeed pdf epub

Paul Tough

“Drop the flashcards—grit, character, and curiosity matter even more than cognitive skills. A persuasive wake-up call.”—People Why do some children succeed while others fail? The story we usually tell about childhood and success is the one about intelligence: success comes to those who score highest on tests, from preschool admissions to SATs. But in How Children Succeed, Paul Tough argues that the qualities that matter more have to do with character: skills like perseverance, curiosity, optimism, and self-control. How Children Succeed introduces us to a new generation of researchers and educators, who, for the first time, are using the tools of science to peel back the mysteries of character. Through their stories—and the stories of the children they are trying to help—Tough reveals how this new knowledge can transform young people’s lives. He uncovers the surprising ways in which parents do—and do not—prepare their children for adulthood. And he provides us with new insights into how to improve the lives of children growing up in poverty. This provocative and profoundly hopeful book will not only inspire and engage readers, it will also change our understanding of childhood itself. “Illuminates the extremes of American childhood: for rich kids, a safety net drawn so tight it’s a harness; for poor kids, almost nothing to break their fall.”—New York Times “I learned so much reading this book and I came away full of hope about how we can make life better for all kinds of kids.”—Slate

download ebook how children succeed pdf epub

Hamzer akyuz

Why do some children succeed while others fail? The story we usually tell about childhood and success is the one about intelligence: success comes to those who score highest on tests, from preschool admissions to SATs. But in How Children Succeed, Paul Tough argues that the qualities that matter most have more to do with character: skills like perseverance, curiosity, conscientiousness, optimism, and self-control. How Children Succeed introduces us to a new generation of researchers and educators who, for the first time, are using the tools of science to peel back the mysteries of character. Through their stories—and the stories of the children they are trying to help—Tough traces the links between childhood stress and life success. He uncovers the surprising ways in which parents do—and do not—prepare their children for adulthood. And he provides us with new insights into how to help children growing up in poverty. Early adversity, scientists have come to understand, can not only affect the conditions of children’s lives, it can alter the physical development of their brains as well. But now educators and doctors around the country are using that knowledge to develop innovative interventions that allow children to overcome the constraints of poverty. And with the help of these new strategies, as Tough’s extraordinary reporting makes clear, children who grow up in the most painful circumstances can go on to achieve amazing things. This provocative and profoundly hopeful book has the potential to change how we raise our children, how we run our schools, and how we construct our social safety net. It will not only inspire and engage readers, it will also change our understanding of childhood itself. Amazon.com Review Q&A with Paul Tough Q. What made you want to write How Children Succeed? A. In 2008, I published my first book, Whatever It Takes, about Geoffrey Canada and the Harlem Children’s Zone. I spent five years reporting that book, but when I finished it, I realized I still had a lot of questions about what really happens in childhood. How Children Succeed is an attempt to answer those questions, which for many of us are big and mysterious and central in our lives: Why do certain children succeed while other children fail? Why is it, exactly, that poor children are less likely to succeed, on average, than middle-class children? And most important, what can we all do to steer more kids toward success? Q. Where did you go to find the answers? A. My reporting for this book took me all over the country, from a pediatric clinic in a low-income San Francisco neighborhood to a chess tournament in central Ohio to a wealthy private school in New York City. And what I found as I reported was that there is a new and groundbreaking conversation going on, out of the public eye, about childhood and success and failure. It is very different than the traditional education debate. There are economists working on this, neuroscientists, psychologists, medical doctors. They are often working independently from one another. They don’t always coordinate their efforts. But they’re beginning to find some common ground, and together they’re reaching some interesting and important conclusions. Q. A lot of your reporting for this book was in low-income neighborhoods. Overall, what did you learn about kids growing up in poverty? A. A lot of what we think we know about the effect of poverty on a child’s development is just plain wrong. It’s certainly indisputable that growing up in poverty is really hard on children. But the conventional wisdom is that the big problem for low-income kids is that they don’t get enough cognitive stimulation early on. In fact, what seems to have more of an effect is the chaotic environments that many low-income kids grow up in and the often stressful relationships they have with the adults around them. That makes a huge difference in how children’s brains develop, and scientists are now able to trace a direct route from those early negative experiences to later problems in school, health, and behavior. The problem is that science isn’t yet reflected in the way we run our schools and operate our social safety net. And that’s a big part of why so many low-income kids don’t do well in school. We now know better than ever what kind of help they need to succeed in school. But very few schools are equipped to deliver that help. Q. Many readers were first exposed to your reporting on character through your article in the New York Times Magazine in September 2011, which was titled "What If the Secret to Success Is Failure?" How does failure help us succeed? A. That’s an idea that I think was best expressed by Dominic Randolph, the head of the Riverdale Country School, an exclusive private school in the Bronx where they’re now doing some interesting experiments with teaching character. Here’s how he put it: "The idea of building grit and building self-control is that you get that through failure. And in most highly academic environments in the United States, no one fails anything." That idea resonated with a lot of readers. I don’t think it’s quite true that failure itself helps us succeed. In fact, repeated failures can be quite devastating to a child’s development. What I think is important on the road to success is learning to deal with failure, to manage adversity. That’s a skill that parents can certainly help their children develop--but so can teachers and coaches and mentors and neighbors and lots of other people. Q. How did writing this book affect you as a parent? A. My wife and I became parents for the first time just as I started reporting this book, and our son Ellington is now three. Those are crucial years in a child’s development, and I spent a lot of them reading papers on the infant brain and studies on attachment and trauma and stress hormones, trying not to get too overwhelmed. In the end, though, this research had a surprising effect: it made me more relaxed as a parent. When Ellington was born, I was very much caught up in the idea of childhood as a race--the faster a child develops skills, the better he does on tests, the better he’ll do in life. Having done this reporting, I’m less concerned about my son’s reading and counting ability. Don’t get me wrong, I still want him to know that stuff. But I think he’ll get there in time. What I’m more concerned about is his character--or whatever the right synonym is for character when you’re talking about a three-year-old. I want him to be able to get over disappointments, to calm himself down, to keep working at a puzzle even when it’s frustrating, to be good at sharing, to feel loved and confident and full of a sense of belonging. Most important, I want him to be able to deal with failure. That’s a difficult thing for parents to give their children, since we have deep in our DNA the urge to shield our kids from every kind of trouble. But what we’re finding out now is that in trying to protect our children, we may actually be harming them. By not giving them the chance to learn to manage adversity, to cope with failure, we produce kids who have real problems when they grow up. Overcoming adversity is what produces character. And character, even more than IQ, is what leads to real and lasting success. From Booklist Starred Review Debunking the conventional wisdom of the past few decades that disadvantaged children need to develop basic reading and counting skills before entering school, Tough argues that they would be better served by learning such skills as grit, conscientiousness, curiosity, and optimism. It boils down to a debate about precognitive versus noncognitive skills of self-regulation or, simply put, character. Tough (Whatever It Takes, 2008) spent two years interviewing students, teachers, and administrators at failing public schools, alternative programs, charter schools, elite schools, and a variety of after-school programs. He also interviewed psychologists, economists, and neuroscientists and examined the latest research on character education beyond the bromides of the Left and Right to discover what actually works in teaching children skills that will aid them in school and in life, whatever the circumstances of their childhoods. Most compelling are Tough’s portraits of adolescents from backgrounds rife with poverty, violence, drug-addicted parents, sexual abuse, and failing schools, who manage to gain skills that help them overcome their adversities and go on to college. Tough ultimately argues in favor of research indicating that these important skills can be learned and children’s lives saved. A very hopeful look at promising new research on education. --Vanessa Bush

download ebook how children succeed pdf epub

Cathy Wilson

How Children Succeed - Raising Successful Children by Best Selling Health and Wellness Author Cathy Wilson, introduces parenting strategies essential for healthy child growth and development! Wilson shows you how to set your child up for success. Building a solid life platform that teaches your child to become successful. SNEAK PEAK INSIDE... *SCHOOL influence in raising happy children *FAMILY relations building confidence in children *NUTRITION to reverse childhood obesity *EXERCISE build self esteem in children *LIFESTYLE teaching children values *LIFE CHANGES that build confidence in children SOME TOOLS TO PAVE A POSITIVE PATH FOR YOUR CHILD... *POSITIVE ATTITUDE *PERSISTENCE *DEALING WITH LIFE SETBACKS Your responsibility is to show your child how to BELIEVE, SET GOALS, and MAKE THEM REALITY! How Children Succeed: Raising Successful Children is your first step in setting your child up for success!

download ebook how children succeed pdf epub

Nicole Townsend

How Children Succeed: Life Lessons, Role Models, Creating the Road Ahead uncovers remarkable techniques for raising children to succeed. Every parent has a strong desire to have their children succeed. Raising successful children is crucial to them becoming outstanding human beings throughout their adolescent and adult lives. Nicole Townsend covers in great detail what every parent needs to know in order to produce positive results. Successful parenting comes from implementing important life lessons learned in this guide. * What is true success? * What must you specifically teach a child? * Prepare your child for the future, but how? * What three things are important to show your child? * How can you be a true role model? * Academics are an important building block for successful children, but what other child developments are required? Townsend reveals the answers that you need to accomplish these tasks. If you want to be a successful parent, then don't pass up this opportunity. Successful children come from successful parenting.

download ebook how children succeed tough: highly effective great habits for raising successful children healthy habits, bringing up girls, loving boys, teaching strong character pdf epub

Cathy Wilson

How Children Succeed Tough: Highly Effective Great Habits for Raising Successful Children has your SOLUTIONS and MINDSET needed to raise children! Worried your child doesn't have many friends? Are you wondering how to encourage your child to set goals and succeed? Do you wish you had a better connection with your child? Are you worried that your child isn't developing normally? Then this book is for you! Unfortunately, children don't come with a manual. So you need books like this one to help guide and support you raising your child positively. By using proven strategies and openly connecting with your child you WILL prepare them better for life! How Children Succeed Tough: Highly Effective Great Habits for Raising Successful Children has your ANSWERS. Download it today and let's get started!strong>

download ebook how children succeed in 30 minutes - the expert guide to paul tough's critically acclaimed book pdf epub

The 30 Minute Expert Series

We strongly encourage you to purchase the original book titled How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt What does it take to raise happy, productive, and successful kids? More than you might imagine. How Children Succeed ...in 30 Minutes is an introduction to the fascinating idea that the intangibles of character and grit interplay with the tangibles of reading, writing, and arithmetic to produce happy, well-adjusted kids. In How Children Succeed ...in 30 Minutes, you'll learn: Paul Tough's background, education, work history, and credentials Critical reception to the work, including key arguments by major publications and thought leaders Key concepts from the book, including the cognitive hypothesis, the power of character, and cultivating character Key takeaways from Tough's arguments and research Suggestions for applying Tough's theories in everyday life A definition of key terms Conclusions gleaned from How Children Succeed In his groundbreaking best seller, How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character, Paul Tough examines the research of neuroscientists, medical doctors, psychologists, educators, and economists to identify the qualities that lead to successful children and, ultimately, successful adults. How Children Succeed ...in 30 Minutes is a concise guide that will inspire you to read How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character and to appreciate the power of character in both the lives of children and adults. Tough illuminates the complex interaction of how "hard" skills learned in the classroom and "soft" skills, such as impulse control and curiosity, have an acute impact on a child's success. This book is a must-read for parents, prospective parents, teachers, or anyone interested in child development and education. About the 30 Minute Expert Series Offering a concise exploration of a book's ideas, history, application, and critical reception, each text in the 30 Minute Expert Series is designed for busy individuals interested in acquiring an in-depth understanding of seminal works. The 30 Minute Expert Series offers detailed analyses, critical presentations of key ideas and their application, extensive reading lists for additional information, and contextual understanding of the work of leading authors. Designed as companions to the original work, the 30 Minute Expert Series enables readers to develop expert knowledge of an important work ...in 30 minutes.